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Houseplant Orchids

 


Get to know your houseplants. The key to growing healthy houseplants is understanding the amount of light they like, how thirsty they may get, and individual characteristics that work best in your space. Once you’ve selected a good match, the rest is easy!

 

Other Houseplant Categories:

Bromeliads   |   Flowering   |   Foliage   |   Palms   |   Tillandsia


Orchids

Corsage Orchid, Cymbidium


High. Bright light is necessary for Cymbidium. Typically, they are grown on a protected patio, where the outside light is best. They’ll tolerate some direct sun, briefly, such as very early morning.
Medium. These orchids need excellent drainage and don’t like wet roots.
Very flexible plants, but they appreciate some humidity. Cymbidiums are terrestrial orchids, meaning they grow in soil. Use Orchid Potting Mix with a little fine Orchid Bark when re-potting. Fertilize when out of bloom.
Provide plants with crowded conditions; they won’t bloom when planted in roomy containers. Grow them outside in semi-shade. Temperatures need to be between 50-60°F to force flower spikes. Optimum temperatures in winter are 45-55°F at night and 55-75°F during the day. Move to more protection if temperatures drop lower than 40°F. Summer temperatures can be higher.

Spray Orchid, Dendrobium


High. Bright light is always best for orchids when encouraging growth and bloom. Moving them to less bright location when in bloom will extend the bloom time.
Medium. These orchids grow in trees and their roots don’t like constant moisture. But, they won’t thrive if kept too dry.
Orchids are happiest in humid conditions, with moderate temperatures. Use Orchid Bark when re-potting with Dendrobiums a little Orchid Potting Mix with the bark can help if plants are in a drier location. Fertilize with a balanced orchid fertilizer. “Weakly, weekly” is the usual rule for fertilizing.
Only re-pot when plants are over grown and out of bloom; orchids perform best when crowded in their containers. Moderate temperatures are best for re-bloom.

Pansy Orchid, Miltonia


Medium and high. When encouraging orchids to set bloom bright, indirect light is necessary. Miltonia leaves will burn in direct sun. When in bloom, move to a less bright location to extend bloom time.
Medium. These orchids grow in higher elevations in South America where it’s moist but not wet. Allow them to get almost completely dry before watering.
High humidity helps this type of orchid stay hydrated. A mix of Orchid Bark and Orchid Potting Mix provides roots with the perfect drainage.
Miltonia bloom and thrive with cooler temperatures: between 80 and 50°F.

Moth Orchid, Phalaenopsis


Medium and high. When encouraging orchids to set bloom, bright light is necessary. When in bloom, they can be moved to a less bright location to extend bloom time.
Medium. Moth Orchids grow in trees and their roots don’t like constant moisture. But, they won’t thrive if kept too dry. If your plant has air roots they will be silvery-greenish and full when plant is hydrated. When dry, the air roots are all silver-grey.
Orchids are happiest in humid conditions, with moderate temperatures. Use Orchid Bark when re-potting. Moss can be used if conditions are too dry, to retain moisture. Fertilize with an orchid growth formula when plants are out of bloom or during spring and summer. Use an orchid bloom formula fall and winter. “Weakly, weekly” is the usual rule for fertilizing.
Only re-pot when plants are over grown and out of bloom; orchids perform best when crowded in their containers. Bloom time is usually late fall, winter, early spring with temperatures a cooler.

Do you have a plant not listed above? Take a look at our general Houseplant Pointers.